Filters

Filters allow you to¬†filter your collections with your methods and desires.


The built in conditions are a handy way to filter your collections using simple English phrasing. You can say things like “where this field contains this value”. But sometimes you need more control. Filters will allow you to use your own logic to filter the collection however you like.

Usage

Inside a collection tag (Collection, Taxonomy, etc) you can add filter="my_filter" instead of using the conditions syntax (eg. field:is="something"). This will spin up your filter class and perform the filtering for you.

You can use snake_case in your parameter for consistency - Statamic will convert it to StudlyCase for you.

You can create a new filter by adding site/addons/MyAddon/MyAddonFilter.php, or have one generated for you by using php please make:filter MyAddon.

Example

Let’s say you wanted to only show entries whose title contained the word “bacon”. (Yes, you could do this with regular conditions, but hey it’s an example.)

<?php

namespace Statamic\Addons\Word;

use Statamic\Extend\Filter;

class WordFilter extends Filter
{
    public function filter()
    {
        return $this->collection->filter(function ($entry) {
            return str_contains($entry->get('title'), 'bacon');
        });
    }
}

A few things to note:

  • Your class’ filter method should return a Collection. This is what gets sent back to your tag.
  • Within the collection, you will get an instance of the data object. In this example we’re looping through entries, so we get an Entry object.
  • You aren’t restricted to using ->filter() on the collection. Feel free to manipulate the collection however you wish using the methods listed on the Laravel docs.

Context and Parameters

Within your filter, you have access to the context and any parameters on the tag.

Context is simple enough. It will be an array of data which you can access using $this->context.

For parameters, you can access these using the same methods available on Tags. This includes things like $this->get(), $this->getBool(), etc.

Looking back at the example above, let’s say you don’t want to assume the word is always “bacon”. You can read from parameters.

{{ collection:blog filter="word" word="pie" }}
class WordFilter extends Filter
{
    public function filter()
    {
        return $this->collection->filter(function ($entry) {
            return str_contains(
                $entry->get('title'),
                $this->get('word', 'bacon')
            );
        });
    }
}

Now we’re getting the value of the word parameter, and if it doesn’t exist we default back to bacon. Delicious, dependable bacon.

Last modified on September 12, 2016